Safecility and Limerick councils to find fire safety solutions

Rachel Halpin

The solutions will be carried out in Limerick City’s Georgian Quarter, where there is a vacancy rate of up to 67 per cent of the upper floors of the Georgian and other historical buildings

Limerick City and County Council teamed up with Safecility to provide innovative fire safety solutions for Limerick City’s historical buildings.

 

The solutions will be carried out in Limerick City’s Georgian Quarter, where there is a vacancy rate of up to 67 per cent of the upper floors of the Georgian and other historical buildings. The ground floors of these buildings are occupied by retail, commercial or office space.

 

Limerick City and County Council and Enterprise Ireland collaborated to launch a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) challenge to find innovative solutions to address fire safety issues in historic buildings.

 

The contract for the Georgian Quarter was awarded to Safecility in mid-January. Safecility and Limerick City and County Council began work on January 29th. According to CEO of Safecility, Cian O’Flaherty, the Safecility team are working on a sensor solution that is purposeful and discreet.

 

Safecility is a Dublin based start-up company who provide a smart wireless Automated Test System for emergency lighting, which is a key requirement of fire safety regulations.

 

They use smart sensors to automatically test and monitor each light daily, weekly and monthly to meet legal requirements. The information is reported to the owner of the building via a cloud platform.

 

The SBIR project aims to lower the cost of upgrading the usable space in Limerick City Centre for residential use and thus, contributing to the regeneration of the city centre.

 

At the launch of the project, CEO O’Flaherty said that “fire safety testing is legally incumbent on commercial and multi-unit building owners. With our sensor we can automate emergency lighting testing and improve compliance to make city buildings safer more affordably.”

 

“But that’s only the beginning. Our goal is to offer a full suite of building compliance services through our simple sensor which can be quickly installed at minimal cost to landlords and owners,” he added.

 

The use of the wireless system will eliminate manual inspection, which means that human error is no longer an issue. The system also ensures the historical character and existing fabric of the building remains unaffected, while still being compliant with fire safety guidelines.

 

This project is part of the Limerick 2030 plan, a report released in November 2014 by Limerick City and County Council, to transform Limerick City Centre, its economy and the way the it’s marketed into an ideal location for investment in years to come.

Rachel Halpin

Image credit: Air Combat Command