Complaints have risen over Eurovision being hosted by Israel

Eoin Harte

Ireland will send a contestant to the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest despite complaints about the competition being held in Israel.


A spokesperson for Eurovision confirmed that “Ireland are included in our announcement”
for the list of nations competing in this year’s contest.
Members of the public have urged RTE to not broadcast the competition, but as things stand
Eurovision will be televised as usual and are looking for entrants.
Rayna Connery from the RTE Press Office confirmed that RTE would broadcast 2019s
competition.
“RTÉ is a registered participant in the 2019 ESC, which promotes values of diversity and
inclusion and is broadcast to around 200 million viewers worldwide. As a long running non-
political, entertainment event, the ESC is designed to bring audiences and countries
together.
“RTÉ is confident that the EBU and the host broadcaster will take all necessary steps to
safeguard the non-political character of the event throughout the organization of the
competition. RTÉ anticipates its coverage will be as in previous years.”
DCU students are torn about the issue as many believe that Israel’s treatment of Palestine is
unacceptable but think that the popular music competition should not be politicised.
Accounting and Finance student Ciaran Briody was in favour of Ireland sending a contestant
to this year’s competition in Israel.
“The Eurovision is just a bit of fun it’s not all political. It should be a time to forget about all
the political stuff in the world,” Briody said.
However, Multimedia student Raphael Palma Gil was unhappy that Ireland are planning on
sending a contestant to this year’s competition in Tel Aviv.
“No in the sense that there’s a lot of like, especially just with the voting in Eurovision when it
comes to that stage there’s a lot of politically charged undertones I find.
“With that respect and everything going on with Israel and Palestine I don’t think we should.
Also I don’t think Israel have a justified reason to be in the Eurovision to begin with,” Palma
Gil commented.
Journalism students Rachel and Shauna Power were both in favour of Ireland competing in
this year’s competition.
“I think that Ireland’s always been neutral in history so I don’t think that now especially with
the Eurovision and how its meant to bring everyone together that it’s the time to start getting
political. I think we should just stay neutral and stay out of it,” Rachel Power said.
Shauna Power echoed the same sentiments saying, “I think Eurovision is a thing that brings
people together so I think they should leave politics out of it. The Eurovision is something
that brings happiness and joy so they should just leave it.”

Eoin Harte

Image credit: Eurovision